{Resort 2020} Gucci Takes the Fight to Women’s Reproductive Rights

The Gucci show is always half about the clothing, half about the experience. With the cruise 2020 collection, show goers received notes with cryptic instructions sending them to a bookstore, to find antique Greek and Latin books with the invitation and details to the show inside. Oh, the intrigue! Are we in a Harry Potter novel?

At the show, a bed sheet was hung from the entryway of the Musei Capitolini in Rome, quoting Paul Veyne,

Because only pagan antiquity could arouse my desire. Because it was the world of the past, because it was a world that no longer exists.”

The museum, reminiscent of Alessandro Michele’s childhood, dates back to the 1400’s as the first known museum collection, holding donated bronze statues from Pope Sixtus IV. The halls were dimly lit, echoing a history in stone paramount to much of humanity.

Musei Capitolini, Rome - Hall with ancient Renaissance statues - Gucci Cruise 2020 - Courtesy of Gucci
Musei Capitolini, Rome- Model walking runway wearing Gucci Cruise 2020 black dress with headdress

And in that lens, Alessandro Michele sent his latest fare down the runway past the statues (and viewers alike), and the juxtaposition couldn’t have been more noticable. By virtue of the medium, the statuary felt austere, void of color, often with a focus toward classical romanticism. Yet the Gucci style is antithesis to these features. Many of the looks are loud, nerdy-asexual, clashing patterns, and layers upon layers of bulky clothing.

But we see some of the overt inspirations of the centuries in the collection, like the gold rope-edged red cloak, various forms of the tunic, and renditions of the toga that ranged from costume to must-have like the pleated pink on yellow number.

Then things got very interesting with the show turning to current politics, with the clothing making statements about the abortion issue. On the back of a purple jacquard pant suit had big red text reading My Body, My Choice. An embroidered uterus’ placement was relatively anatomically correct on an ivory pleat dress. A capelet over a pajama top and matching skirt displayed the date 22.05.1978 – when the Italian law protecting legal abortions took effect. Corduroy pants came out with a  Chime for Change tee.

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These came, of course, with a return once again to decades past, focusing especially on his favorite 70’s vibe. High-waisted midi skirts were coupled with printed tops and argyle sweater vests. It was no holds barred with plaid.

These came, of course, with a return once again to decades past, focusing especially on his favorite 70’s vibe. High-waisted midi skirts were coupled with printed tops and argyle sweater vests. It was no holds barred with plaid.

As these looks all culminate together in one collection, it’s not lost that Rome is the perfect setting. The birthplace of democratic freedom. Combine that with the vibe of an era filled with protests for women’s equality, and you have quite the powerful, united statement. The women of today, our mothers, our ancestors.

 

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3 Comments

    • luxelookbook Reply

      I was definitely a fan of the brighter tones as well. Thanks Amy!

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